likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 

This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century.

Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”

1. Peter Ilsted

2. Carl Holsøe

3. Léon Cogniet

4. Wilhelm Bendz

5. Alfred Broge

6. Caspar David Friedrich

7. Georg Friedrich Kersting

8. Jacobus Vrel

9. Johann Erdmann Hummel

10. Vilhelm Hammershøi

(via post-impressionisms)

Timestamp: 1409334785

likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 

This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century.

Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”

1. Peter Ilsted

2. Carl Holsøe

3. Léon Cogniet

4. Wilhelm Bendz

5. Alfred Broge

6. Caspar David Friedrich

7. Georg Friedrich Kersting

8. Jacobus Vrel

9. Johann Erdmann Hummel

10. Vilhelm Hammershøi

(via post-impressionisms)

fuckyeahlouvre:

le sacre de napoléon (the coronation of napoleon) with detail
jacques-louis david, 1805-1807

(via vermontparnasse)

Timestamp: 1409288885

fuckyeahlouvre:

le sacre de napoléon (the coronation of napoleon) with detail
jacques-louis david, 1805-1807

(via vermontparnasse)

ancientart:

The lion hunts of Ashurbanipal -details from the hall reliefs of the Palace at Ninevah

Assyrian king Ashurbanipal, who reigned 669-630 BCE, is shown in the first detail to be aiming his bow and arrow atop a chariot. The second image displays an arrow of his shot, flying in mid-air towards a lion. A close-up of Ashurbanipal is given in the final photograph to present the immense detail of these reliefs, for instance, note the intricate carvings which cover his clothing.

Artefacts courtesy of & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photos taken by Steven Zucker.

Timestamp: 1409282134

ancientart:

The lion hunts of Ashurbanipal -details from the hall reliefs of the Palace at Ninevah

Assyrian king Ashurbanipal, who reigned 669-630 BCE, is shown in the first detail to be aiming his bow and arrow atop a chariot. The second image displays an arrow of his shot, flying in mid-air towards a lion. A close-up of Ashurbanipal is given in the final photograph to present the immense detail of these reliefs, for instance, note the intricate carvings which cover his clothing.

Artefacts courtesy of & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photos taken by Steven Zucker.

ancientart:

Delphi Tholos, Greece. The tholos was created approximately 380-360 BC within the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia.

Photo taken by Kufoleto.

Timestamp: 1409275387

ancientart:

Delphi Tholos, Greece. The tholos was created approximately 380-360 BC within the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia.

Photo taken by Kufoleto.

beyond-the-canvas:

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Kiss. 1893, oil on cardboard. Private collection.

Timestamp: 1409268648

beyond-the-canvas:

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, The Kiss. 1893, oil on cardboard. Private collection.

pixography:

Gustav Klimt ~ "Medicine" (concept), 1897

The painting, Die Medizin (Kompositionsentwurf), is an 1897–98 study for one of a series of massive, controversial paintings the artist was commissioned to create for the ceiling of the Great Hall at the University of Vienna by Austria’s Ministry of Culture and Education in 1894.

The three finished works were never displayed in the hall, due to their purportedly pornographic content, and were destroyed by retreating German forces as World War II drew to a close in 1945. The Die Medizin study, characterized by its unique blend of neo-Baroque and Secessionist aesthetics, is the only extant version of any of the three panels. <source>

Timestamp: 1409261883

pixography:

Gustav Klimt ~ "Medicine" (concept), 1897

The painting, Die Medizin (Kompositionsentwurf), is an 1897–98 study for one of a series of massive, controversial paintings the artist was commissioned to create for the ceiling of the Great Hall at the University of Vienna by Austria’s Ministry of Culture and Education in 1894.

The three finished works were never displayed in the hall, due to their purportedly pornographic content, and were destroyed by retreating German forces as World War II drew to a close in 1945. The Die Medizin study, characterized by its unique blend of neo-Baroque and Secessionist aesthetics, is the only extant version of any of the three panels. <source>

lionofchaeronea:

Teppōzu Akashi-bashi (The Akashi Bridge at Teppozu), from the series Scenic Places in Tokyo, Hiroshige III, ca. 1870

Timestamp: 1409255130

lionofchaeronea:

Teppōzu Akashi-bashi (The Akashi Bridge at Teppozu), from the series Scenic Places in Tokyo, Hiroshige III, ca. 1870

missbingleys:

art history meme: (1/5) movements - The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

The Pre-Raphaelites were a group of English painters, poets, and critics that were founded in 1848. The group’s intention was to reform art by rejecting what it considered the mechanistic approach first adopted by Mannerist artists who succeeded Raphael and Michelangelo.

Lady Godiva by John Collier, 1897

Lady of Shalot by John William Waterhouse, 1888

Hylas and the Nymphs by John William Waterhouse, 1896

God Speed! by Edward Leighton, 1900

Ophelia by John William Waterhouse, 1889

Timestamp: 1409248377

missbingleys:

art history meme: (1/5) movements - The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

The Pre-Raphaelites were a group of English painters, poets, and critics that were founded in 1848. The group’s intention was to reform art by rejecting what it considered the mechanistic approach first adopted by Mannerist artists who succeeded Raphael and Michelangelo.

Lady Godiva by John Collier, 1897

Lady of Shalot by John William Waterhouse, 1888

Hylas and the Nymphs by John William Waterhouse, 1896

God Speed! by Edward Leighton, 1900

Ophelia by John William Waterhouse, 1889

Ivan Aivazovsky - Constantinople

Timestamp: 1409202485

Ivan Aivazovsky - Constantinople

lionofchaeronea:

The Adoration of the Magi, Albrecht Dürer, 1504

Timestamp: 1409195737

lionofchaeronea:

The Adoration of the Magi, Albrecht Dürer, 1504

lionofchaeronea:

The Breakwater, Jacob van Ruisdael, 1670-72

Timestamp: 1409188991

lionofchaeronea:

The Breakwater, Jacob van Ruisdael, 1670-72

im-not-mine:

John Henry Fuseli, The Nightmare, 1781.

The Nightmare is a 1781 oil painting by Anglo- Swiss artist Henry Fuseli. Since its creation, it has remained Fuseli’s best-known work. With its first exhibition in 1782 at the Royal Academy of London, the image became famous; an engraved version was widely distributed and the painting was parodied in political satire. Due to its fame, Fuseli painted at least three other versions of the painting.

Interpretations of The Nightmare have varied widely. The canvas seems to portray simultaneously a dreaming woman and the content of her nightmare. The incubus and the horse’s head refer to contemporary belief and folklore about nightmares, but have been ascribed more specific meanings by some theorists. Contemporary critics were taken aback by the overt sexuality of the painting, which has since been interpreted by some scholars as anticipating Freudian ideas about the unconscious.

Contemporary critics often found the work scandalous due to its sexual themes. A few years before he painted The Nightmare, Fuseli had fallen passionately in love with a woman named Anna Landholdt in Zürich, while he was travelling from Rome to London. Landholdt was the niece of his friend, the Swiss physiognomist Johann Kaspar Lavater. Fuseli wrote of his fantasies to Lavater in 1779:

"Last night I had her in bed with me—tossed my bedclothes hugger-mugger—wound my hot and tight-clasped hands about her—fused her body and soul together with my own—poured into her my spirit, breath and strength. Anyone who touches her now commits adultery and incest! She is mine, and I am hers. And have her I will.…"

Fuseli’s marriage proposal met with disapproval from the woman’s father, and in any case Fuseli’s love seems to have been unrequited—Landholdt married a family friend soon after. The Nightmare, then, can be seen as a personal portrayal of the erotic aspects of love lost. Art historian H. W. Janson suggests that the sleeping woman represents Landholdt and that the demon is Fuseli himself. Bolstering this claim is an unfinished portrait of a girl on the back of the painting’s canvas, which may portray Landholdt. Anthropologist Charles Stewart, in his study of erotic dreams and nightmares, characterises the sleeping woman as “voluptuous,” and one scholar of the Gothic describes her as lying in a “sexually receptive position.” In Woman as Sex Object (1972), Marcia Allentuck similarly argues that the painting’s intent is to show female orgasm. This is supported by Fuseli’s sexually overt and even pornographic private drawings (e.g., Symplegma of Man with Two Women, 1770–78). Fuseli’s painting has been considered representative of sublimated sexual instincts. Related interpretations of the painting view the incubus as a dream symbol of male libido, with the sexual act represented by the horse’s intrusion through the curtain. Fuseli himself provided no commentary on his painting.

The Royal Academy exhibition brought Fuseli and his painting enduring fame. The exhibition included Shakespeare-themed works by Fuseli, which won him a commission to produce eight paintings for publisher John Boydell’s Shakespeare Gallery. One version of The Nightmare hung in the home of Fuseli’s close friend and publisher Joseph Johnson, gracing his weekly dinners for London thinkers and writers. 

Fuseli painted other versions of The Nightmare following the success of the first; at least three other versions survive. The other important canvas was painted between 1790 and 1791 and is held at the Goethe Museum in Frankfurt. It is smaller than the original, and the woman’s head lies to the left; a mirror opposes her on the right. The demon is looking at the woman rather than out of the picture, and it has pointed, catlike ears. The most significant difference in the remaining two versions is an erotic statuette of a couple on the table.

Timestamp: 1409182230

im-not-mine:

John Henry Fuseli, The Nightmare, 1781.

The Nightmare is a 1781 oil painting by Anglo- Swiss artist Henry Fuseli. Since its creation, it has remained Fuseli’s best-known work. With its first exhibition in 1782 at the Royal Academy of London, the image became famous; an engraved version was widely distributed and the painting was parodied in political satire. Due to its fame, Fuseli painted at least three other versions of the painting.

Interpretations of The Nightmare have varied widely. The canvas seems to portray simultaneously a dreaming woman and the content of her nightmare. The incubus and the horse’s head refer to contemporary belief and folklore about nightmares, but have been ascribed more specific meanings by some theorists. Contemporary critics were taken aback by the overt sexuality of the painting, which has since been interpreted by some scholars as anticipating Freudian ideas about the unconscious.

Contemporary critics often found the work scandalous due to its sexual themes. A few years before he painted The Nightmare, Fuseli had fallen passionately in love with a woman named Anna Landholdt in Zürich, while he was travelling from Rome to London. Landholdt was the niece of his friend, the Swiss physiognomist Johann Kaspar Lavater. Fuseli wrote of his fantasies to Lavater in 1779:

"Last night I had her in bed with me—tossed my bedclothes hugger-mugger—wound my hot and tight-clasped hands about her—fused her body and soul together with my own—poured into her my spirit, breath and strength. Anyone who touches her now commits adultery and incest! She is mine, and I am hers. And have her I will.…"

Fuseli’s marriage proposal met with disapproval from the woman’s father, and in any case Fuseli’s love seems to have been unrequited—Landholdt married a family friend soon after. The Nightmare, then, can be seen as a personal portrayal of the erotic aspects of love lost. Art historian H. W. Janson suggests that the sleeping woman represents Landholdt and that the demon is Fuseli himself. Bolstering this claim is an unfinished portrait of a girl on the back of the painting’s canvas, which may portray Landholdt. Anthropologist Charles Stewart, in his study of erotic dreams and nightmares, characterises the sleeping woman as “voluptuous,” and one scholar of the Gothic describes her as lying in a “sexually receptive position.” In Woman as Sex Object (1972), Marcia Allentuck similarly argues that the painting’s intent is to show female orgasm. This is supported by Fuseli’s sexually overt and even pornographic private drawings (e.g., Symplegma of Man with Two Women, 1770–78). Fuseli’s painting has been considered representative of sublimated sexual instincts. Related interpretations of the painting view the incubus as a dream symbol of male libido, with the sexual act represented by the horse’s intrusion through the curtain. Fuseli himself provided no commentary on his painting.

The Royal Academy exhibition brought Fuseli and his painting enduring fame. The exhibition included Shakespeare-themed works by Fuseli, which won him a commission to produce eight paintings for publisher John Boydell’s Shakespeare Gallery. One version of The Nightmare hung in the home of Fuseli’s close friend and publisher Joseph Johnson, gracing his weekly dinners for London thinkers and writers. 

Fuseli painted other versions of The Nightmare following the success of the first; at least three other versions survive. The other important canvas was painted between 1790 and 1791 and is held at the Goethe Museum in Frankfurt. It is smaller than the original, and the woman’s head lies to the left; a mirror opposes her on the right. The demon is looking at the woman rather than out of the picture, and it has pointed, catlike ears. The most significant difference in the remaining two versions is an erotic statuette of a couple on the table.

theartistsmanifesto:

An early Egon Schiele, Trees Mirrored in a Pond, 1907, Oil on cardboard. 

Timestamp: 1409175474

theartistsmanifesto:

An early Egon Schiele, Trees Mirrored in a Pond, 1907, Oil on cardboard. 

medievalistsnet:

Northern Renaissance? Burgundy And Netherlandish Art In Fifteenth-Century Europe

Hanno Wijsman

Renaissance? Perceptions of Continuity and Discontinuity in Europe, c.1300- c.1550: pp 269-288, (2010)

Abstract

Everyone who has studied medieval or modern history knows that the periodisation of the eras on either side of the Renaissance provides much food for thought. This contribution aims irst to address the usefulness of the widespread concept of the ‘Northern Renaissance’. This will inevitably involve an examination of the more general concept of the ‘Renaissance’, but this will be considered in the context of the relationship between North and South in thirteenth-century Europe. On account of the massive bibliography on this topic, this article cannot claim to be comprehensive, but will examine only key works and some recent contributions. Second, I hope to show here that the history of the book, of book collecting and of library formation can shed new light on more general problems in cultural history…

Timestamp: 1409168744

medievalistsnet:

Northern Renaissance? Burgundy And Netherlandish Art In Fifteenth-Century Europe

Hanno Wijsman

Renaissance? Perceptions of Continuity and Discontinuity in Europe, c.1300- c.1550: pp 269-288, (2010)

Abstract

Everyone who has studied medieval or modern history knows that the periodisation of the eras on either side of the Renaissance provides much food for thought. This contribution aims irst to address the usefulness of the widespread concept of the ‘Northern Renaissance’. This will inevitably involve an examination of the more general concept of the ‘Renaissance’, but this will be considered in the context of the relationship between North and South in thirteenth-century Europe. On account of the massive bibliography on this topic, this article cannot claim to be comprehensive, but will examine only key works and some recent contributions. Second, I hope to show here that the history of the book, of book collecting and of library formation can shed new light on more general problems in cultural history…